Seiten

  • Startseite
  • Impressum
  • Inhalt
  • MINT
  • Sprache
  • Soziales
  • Geist
  • Kunst
  • Gemischtes
  • Gedichte

Montag, 4. November 2013

Copper ball

Today I met the following problem:

A copper ball gets dropped and hits the ground with a temperature of 600°C. Which start height did it have if its start temperature is 0°C?

energy balance: Epot = Ekin + Etherm

m · g · y0 = ½ · m · v2 + m · cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · v2 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · (g · t)2 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · (g · √[2 · (y1 - y0) · g-1])2 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · g2 · 2 · (y1 - y0) · g-1 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = g · (y1 - y0) + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = g · y1 - g · y0 + cCu · ΔT

2 · g · y0 = g · y1 + cCu · ΔT

y0 = (g · y1 + cCu · ΔT) · (2 · g)-1

y0 = (9,81 m · s-2 · 0 m + 0,39 J · g-1 · K-1 · 600 K) · (2 · 9,81 m · s-2)-1

y0 = (0,39 J · g-1 · K-1 · 600 K) · (2 · 9,81 m · s-2)-1

y0 = 11,9 m

The start height was 11,9 m.

So if you let fall a copper ball from your twelve metres high roof it will get a temperature of more than 600 degrees.

... Really? That's a little bit too hot for twelve metres height, isn't it? The next calculation includes the air resistance.

m · g · y0 = ½ · m · v2 + m · cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · v2 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ½ · FR · (½ · cW · A · ρ)-1 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = m · g · (cW · A · ρ)-1 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = V · ρCu · g · (cW · A · ρ)-1 + cCu · ΔT

g · y0 = ¾-1 · r · ρCu · g · (cW · ρ)-1 + cCu · ΔT | r = 1 cm

y0 = ¾-1 · r · ρCu · (cW · ρ)-1 + cCu · ΔT · g-1

y0 = ¾-1 · 0,01 m · 8960 kg · m-3 · (0,45 · 1,29 kg · m-3)-1 + 0,39 J · g-1 · K-1 · 600 K · (9,81 m · s-2)-1

y0 = 229,7 m

The start height was 229,7 m.

This result may be a bit more realistic. But mind that the copper ball emits thermal energy the whole time (the air cools it). So a heating onto this temperature isn't realistic at all.

Keine Kommentare:

Kommentar veröffentlichen